BSN Programs Oregon

Registered nursing graduates have a difficult time finding a job if they don’t have a bachelor’s degree. For many years, the associate’s degree in nursing (ADN) has held its position as the benchmark for practice, but a paradigm shift in the industry is causing more hospitals to expect a higher level of education from their RNs. As the emphasis shifts to preventative and patient-based primary care, many hospital institutions will require their RNs to hold a BSN degree or higher.… Read the rest

RN to BSN Programs Oregon

Rapid changes in healthcare lead to higher expectations from the largest part of the healthcare team. Loftier credentialing expectations drive registered nurses with an associate’s degree to enroll in RN to BSN programs to secure a bachelor’s degree. When the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released the Future of Nursing Report in 2010 and recommended that 80 percent of the nursing workforce hold a BSN degree by 2020, only 30 percent of practicing nurses held the advanced degree. Today, close to … Read the rest

Oregon RN Requirements and Training Programs

Oregon State faces a major shortage of nurses in the areas of long-term care, hospice care, geriatric care, and public health. Nurses comprise the largest segment of the healthcare workforce in Oregon. The demand is dependent on the nursing needs of the aging population. Although there is an all-round need for nurses, the greatest need is within long-term care to meet the complex care needs of senior Oregonians. According to a 2015 report from the Oregon Center for Nursing, the … Read the rest

DNP Programs Washington

Since the implementation of the full practice for ARNPs in Washington took effect in 2009, nurses within the profession have experienced great success in delivering high quality and affordable care to populations in rural and medically underserved areas. Full-practice authority allows ARNPs to assess, diagnose, interpret diagnostic tests, and prescribe medications independently. The Institute of Medicine and the National Council for State Boards recommended full practice status in 2010 to provide patients with direct access to the full host of … Read the rest

MSN Programs Washington

Rising demand for primary care, due to aging, population growth, and expanded health insurance coverage under the affordable care act, places additional pressure on an overburdened health care system. By permitting nurse practitioners to practice to the full extent of their training, Washington State seeks to optimize its existing primary care activity and increase access to care to residents in underserved rural areas.

Full practice authority in Washington gives nurse practitioners the freedom to evaluate, diagnose, initiate, and manage the … Read the rest

BSN Programs Washington

Enrolling in a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing (BSN) program to obtain licensure should be just the beginning of your educational preparation as a nurse. The rapidly changing health care environment and expanding role of nurses demand a BSN education, at minimum, as it is the passport to a rewarding career and a Launchpad to specialized practice.

The BSN degree prepares the nursing workforce with the competencies to lead transformative change with the patient in mind. Healthcare administrators and … Read the rest

RN to BSN Programs Washington

An ongoing shortage of nurses is a major issue that grips the health care sector. Washington State is expected to experience a shortfall of nearly 3,793 nurses by 2020, according to the University Of Washington School Of Medicine.

With approximately 68,700 licensed registered nurses in the state, nursing form the largest segment of the health care workforce. A number of converging factors affect the sector’s ability to produce, recruit, and retain registered nurses, including the aging and retiring workforce, the … Read the rest

Washington RN Requirements and Training Programs

Washington State is facing a challenge to maintain an adequate registered nurse workforce to met population needs for the present and coming decades. Hospitals, long-term care facilities, clinics, physicians’ offices, and other healthcare institutions have to compete for nursing professionals by offering higher salaries, sign-on bonuses, open shifts, and other incentives. Within the health care system, nurses face heavy workloads as there are just not enough hands on deck. The American Nurses Association reports massive short staffing in hospital units, … Read the rest

DNP Programs Missouri

Like many states, Missouri is facing a shortage of primary care providers. The supply of physicians falls short even though the majority of the population has health insurance to pay for medical services. According to the American Association of Medical Colleges, the nation will face a shortage of 94,700 physicians by the year 2025. The U.S Department of Health and Human Services labeled 80 percent of Missouri, including the southeastern areas, as Health Provider Shortage Areas, meaning one of out … Read the rest

MSN Programs Missouri

As the baby boomer generation ages and access to health insurance increases, the nation will face a burdensome shortage of primary care providers. In rural Missouri, there is a reported one primary care physician for every 1,776 citizens. On a nationwide level, the shortfall of physicians is 91,500, with 45,400 being primary care. An aging physician population within the state will create additional challenges as more than 55 percent of practicing physicians are 50 years or older. This shortage of … Read the rest